Christmas at Pensychnant by Jan Ruth.

Christmas at Pensychnant

This beautiful arts and crafts property became the house where Caroline and Ian lived in my latest novel, GIFT HORSE. Of course, my story is a contemporary one, but the setting of this house and its history crept under my skin, especially seeing it dressed for Christmas, embracing those old connections and traditions of the Welsh countryside.

For me, the elegant shabbiness of the house adds a richness not quite quantifiable in words. I guess it has atmosphere – something a writer is always looking to capture.

Pensychnant isn’t a National Trust or Cadw property attracting an entrance fee (although contributions are always encouraged), nor does it house a lot of cordoned-off untouchable valuables. What it does offer is a real, modern experience of a Victorian house. This is partly down to the fact that the house is still very much lived in. The log fires are burned for a great many reasons. Today, Pensychnant works primarily as a conservation centre; holding exhibitions by local wildlife artists, organising guided walks, and of course, the annual Christmas fair when the Welsh dresser is laden with vast quantities of home-baked cakes.

The Turbulent History of Pensychnant. Today’s resident warden, Julian Thompson, has much to share about the history of the estate. The original house is a simple farmhouse dating from about 1690. Because of the existence of a second storey – probably originally accessed by an exterior stone staircase – it suggests that this would have been the property of a family of some means. Interesting that the draught generated between the front and back doors was utilised to winnow corn, and later, Stott affectionately christened the boot room in this part of the house as the Wellington Room. But it’s the Victorian extension built in the Arts and Crafts style (started in 1877 by Stott) which makes Pensychnant so unique.

Stott & Sons built about a fifth of the cotton mills around Lancashire. Surprisingly, the house had a central heating system from new, and in 1923 it received an electricity supply. Built initially as a holiday home for the Stott family, Abraham’s wife was less impressed with the house, particularly its rural location. Fearing he’d never encourage his family to move there, Stott fell into something of a depression about his investment. He reputedly left candles alight in vats of paraffin in the farmhouse, and took his absence. His desperate plan failed, since residents of nearby Crows Nest Hall spotted lights in the windows and went to investigate. Amazingly, Stott managed to escape being charged with arson despite harbouring not one, but three insurance policies about his person! In 1882 the wealth and standing of this hugely influential family clearly held the greater power.

When the mill industry collapsed, Pensychnant was sold to the Collins family before it passed to Doctor Tattersall of Conwy. Then, like the stuff of fiction, something wonderful happened when the great grandson of Stott bought back the entire family estate in 1967.

I’m sure there’s another story in there…

Words and photo by Jan Ruth

Links:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42090387-gift-horse

mybook.to/GiftHorseJANRUTH

 

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2 thoughts on “Christmas at Pensychnant by Jan Ruth.

  1. The cottage I chose for my protagonist to “live in” in my second novel is in an incredible location on the north Devon coast, about 100 yards from the beach. A couple of years after the book came out I found out that the ancestors of a fellow family historian I’d met on Twitter had lived there and then it appeared in the BBC production of The Night Manager!

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